Loss leads to art

Surreal scenes in grays take center stage in Ashley Whitt’s exhibit “The Haunted Mind” on display from March 8 to April 12 at the College of the Mainland Art Gallery.

“When my mother passed away five years ago, I became consumed by depression and anxiety. These images are visual representations of the fears and anxieties that exist within myself,” said Whitt.

“The images are primarily created in wooded areas and isolated landscapes in order to visually depict the unconscious mind.”

Whitt printed images on dass transfer film and transferred them onto a lightweight Japanese paper. The process allowed her to manipulate the photos and blur or distort parts of the image.

“This distortion created during the transfer process creates an ethereal, dreamlike aesthetic that alters the sense of reality in each image. The finished pieces are one of a kind and cannot be replicated,” said Whitt.

“The Haunted Mind” has been featured in several publications including The Hand Magazine and an interview in Fragmentary, an online publication.

Whitt is a fine art photographer whose work deals with themes of duality within the self, psychological states and mortality. She uses a variety of photographic techniques including digital manipulation in Photoshop, sculptural book making and traditional darkroom processes.

Whitt currently is an adjunct professor for Dallas County and Collin County Community Colleges. Her work has been shown locally, nationally, and internationally including Texas, Vermont, California, Connecticut, China and India.

Committed to making contemporary artwork accessible, the gallery is free and open to the public. Exhibits are created and coordinated with speakers and other events to promote the area's richly diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. The gallery is located in the Fine Arts Building and open Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., one hour before COM Community Theatre performances and by appointment.

For more information, please contact 409-933-8354 or 409-933-8348 or visit www.com.edu/gallery.

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